Newsco – FBI offers $10,000 reward for information on missing Native American woman

The FBI is offering a reward (pictured) of up to $10,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of person(s) responsible for the disappearance of Mary Johnson

The FBI has announced a reward for information about the disappearance of Mary Johnson, a Native American woman who vanished from the Tulalip Reservation in Washington in November last year.

The law enforcement agency is offering $10,000 for any details that lead to the ‘identification, arrest, and conviction’ of suspects in the case, according to a Twitter post Wednesday.

Mary Johnson, 40, also known as Mary Johnson Davis, was reported missing on December 9, 2020 by her estranged husband, according to the FBI’s Most Wanted website.

She was last seen November 25, 2020, as she walked on Fire Trail Road on the Tulalip Indian reservation in Marysville, Washington. She was on her way to the home of a friend, but never arrived, the FBI reported. 

The FBI is offering a reward (pictured) of up to $10,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of person(s) responsible for the disappearance of Mary Johnson

Johnson (pictured) has black hair and she has brown eyes as well as a 'sunburst-type tattoo on her upper right arm,' the FBI said.

Johnson (pictured) was on her way to see a friend before she disappeared, approximately on November 25th last year

The FBI’s Seattle field office and the Tulalip Tribal Police are investigating the disappearance of Mary Johnson, last seen on November 25, 2020, walking east on Firetrail Road on the Tulalip Reservation in Washington State. Mary was traveling to a friend’s house and never arrived. She was reported missing on December 9, 2020.

Her disappearance is being investigated by the FBI’s Seattle Field Office and the Tulalip Tribal Police.  

Johnson is described as 5 feet 6 inches and 115 pounds. Her hair is black and she has brown eyes as well as a ‘sunburst-type tattoo on her upper right arm,’ the FBI said. 

She also has a scar across her nose and a birthmark on the back of her neck, according to a video made by the local Tulalip news channel.

The HeraldNet reported that Johnson’s last text message, sent to her friend at 1:52 p.m., said, ‘I am almost to the church’. She was walking on Fire Trail Road. 

Her friend was supposed to drive her to visit a couple at a house near Oso, but that text was the last he got from her. Her cell phone later pinged at towers around north Snohomish County. 

Johnson is one of many Indigenous women to disappear in Washington. 

According to an Urban Indian Health Institute report from 2018, Washington had the second-highest number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, behind New Mexico.

On November 24, the day before she vanished, Johnson’s estranged husband dropped her off at a house on the northern edge of the Tulalip Reservation, according to a search warrant obtained by The HeraldNet. 

Johnson had a suitcase with her. The couple wasn’t getting along, Johnson told a friend. She was worried her husband was moving to California with shared belongings. 

She went to the Tulalip Tribal Court to get legal advice. There, she spoke to a security guard in the lobby, but no attorneys were available. 

According to the warrant, the next day, a friend was supposed to give Johnson a ride to a nearby church, he told police, so she could meet a man who would drive her to the house near Oso where she was going to visit. A third man also wanted a ride.

The two of them were waiting ‘impatiently’ in the man’s truck while he got ready to drive them to the church, according to the warrant filed in Snohomish County Superior Court.  

Instead, the passenger and Johnson ended up walking east from the house on Fire Trail Road, around 1.30 p.m., according to the HeraldNet.

Tulalip Reservation population is more than 4,900 and growing, with 2,700 members residing on the 22,000 acres Tulalip Indian Reservation. It is located north of Everett and the Snohomish River and west of Marysville, Washington

Tulalip Reservation population is more than 4,900 and growing, with 2,700 members residing on the 22,000 acres Tulalip Indian Reservation. It is located north of Everett and the Snohomish River and west of Marysville, Washington

Johnson walked east from the house on 140th Street NW, better known as Fire Trail Road (pictured) at around 1.30 p.m. on November 25

Johnson walked east from the house on 140th Street NW, better known as Fire Trail Road (pictured) at around 1.30 p.m. on November 25

PICTURED: The Firetrail Road, where Johnson was last seen before she disappeared. Her friend was supposed to give Johnson a ride to Arlington, Washington that day.

When her friend got to the church to pick her up, she wasn’t there. A little later, she texted him saying she was almost there.  

This was the last text she sent, according to phone records. She never arrived.

The man who had been walking with Johnson told detectives he stopped at a friend’s house nearby. Johnson kept walking toward the church alone. He reported he also hasn’t seen or heard from her since.

Before her disappearance, Johnson left a voicemail for the couple she was visiting near Oso, according to the warrant. She sounded desperate as she asked her friend to pick up the phone. The couple told police Johnson never arrived.

About an hour later, Johnson’s phone connected to a cell tower in the Oso area, according to the warrant. Police reported she did not have a driver’s license or a vehicle and couldn’t have walked to Oso, about 25 miles, in just two hours.  

Two weeks after Johnson vanished, her estranged husband reported her missing to Tulalip police. He told detectives they usually talked every two days. He became increasingly concerned about her when he found out she hadn’t collected monthly welfare checks from her mail, he reported. 

In a heartbreaking video, Johnson's sisters Nona Blouin (left) and Gerry David (right) continue to search for Mary and are asking for help

In a heartbreaking video, Johnson’s sisters Nona Blouin (left) and Gerry David (right) continue to search for Mary and are asking for help

Johnson's sister, Nona Blouin, shared a post on Facebook (pictured) telling people what the billboard sign for her missing sister would look like on July 7th

Johnson’s sister, Nona Blouin, shared a post on Facebook (pictured) telling people what the billboard sign for her missing sister would look like on July 7th

Meanwhile, in an effort to find their missing relative, Johnson’s family paid for an ad on a local billboard this summer on Interstate 5, near the reservation, asking anyone with information to contact the Tulalip Tribal Police, according to KING-TV. 

Her older sister, Nona Blouin said she hadn’t talked to Johnson in three years because she ‘didn’t approve of her lifestyle’, which included drugs and alcohol.

Johnson’s other sister, Gerry Davis, told KING-TV that the family didn’t know of their sister’s disappearance at the time, until her estranged husband contacted police. 

‘He said that she has been gone for a couple of weeks and that she is not normally gone that long,’ Davis said. ‘If Mary has seen this video, please contact somebody, reach out some way if you’re in trouble.’

‘If she’s not okay, let her come home. Bring her home, for closure, for us, if it happened that way. Because it is an awful feeling to not know where you are at.’

The FBI is asking anyone with information regarding her location or disappearance to submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov. 

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