What to Do This Weekend

What to Do This Weekend

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Welcome. It’s a weekend of holidays for some: Passover ends, Easter’s on Sunday. Spring break is happening even if spring breakers are staying put. There are signs it’s not forever, though: Vaccinated boomers are partying in Boca. Air travel is getting back to normal in some places. There are deals to be had. Your vaccine card may have its privileges.

In the meantime, there’s this weekend.

Consider music as therapy. The bassist, vocalist and producer Esperanza Spalding worked with music therapists and neuroscientists on a trio of songs, coming on Saturday, “meant to bolster listeners, physically and emotionally.” Here she is performing live in San Sebastián in 2009, to get you in the mood.

“WeWork: Or the Making and Breaking of a $47 Billion Unicorn” is streaming on Hulu. Pedro Almodóvar’s first English-language film, “The Human Voice,” starring Tilda Swinton, is only in theaters, but the trailer is exciting on its own. Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s three-part series on Hemingway starts Monday; here’s an interview with the filmmakers. And you can plan out your whole month with the best stuff coming to the Netflix and the other major streaming platforms. (Justin Theroux’s adaptation of his uncle Paul Theroux’s 1981 novel, “The Mosquito Coast,” on Apple TV+ looks promising.)

If you can, find someplace warm outside to tuck into one of the 11 new books we recommend this week. (Jesse McCarthy’s essay collection, “Who Will Pay Reparations on My Soul?,” sounds particularly gripping.) We’ve got five recent classical albums we think you’ll love, reviews of the 2021 Oscar-nominated short films and a roundup of cultural happenings you can attend virtually, like the Joyce Theater’s digital spring season and a Josh Gondelman-hosted Zoom comedy showcase.

And from our Well desk, some resources for tending to your health and family: Check out Perri Klass’s guide to spotting depression in young children. We have some tactics for attending to the grief of the past year. And it turns out what we thought was maskne might be a mask-induced facial rash. (Don’t worry: It’s preventable and treatable.)

Sam Ferrigno in Houston gets solace and inspiration from the music video for “Tilted,” by Christine and the Queens:

The video makes me move just as much now as when I first saw it five years ago. What never gets old are the dancers’ humble and energetic bursts of movement, and the casual grace with which they fall from and return to the stage. The unassuming charisma of the singer, Chris, carries anguish, humor and strength from beginning to end, and the choreography translates those feelings into a kind of anthem simply saying, “I am here, and I am kicking, and I am falling, and now I am gliding. I am living.”

Don’t miss the finale of Season 2 of “Better Things” wherein some of the cast do their own version of the dance.

Is there one song that encapsulates the past year for you? A song that you’ll forever associate with your time in quarantine? Send it to us, athome@nytimes.com, and we’ll make a playlist of everyone’s tracks. (Mine’s definitely “Fire” by Waxahatchee, a constant accompaniment for me since last March. The line “Tomorrow could feel like a hundred years later” will always remind me of how time seemed to stretch and contract by the hour this year.) As always, more ideas for leading a full and cultured life at home or near it appear below. I’ll see you next week.

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